The Juice #2 – Panic! At the Coalmine

Welcome to The Juice, a monthly column at The Slice where we present to you a curated programme of films to tune into each month! This month our programme is Panic! At the Coalmine, exploring horror that centres the working class experience. This edition of The Juice has been put together by Joel Whitaker and Andrea Cordoba When you’re working class, a lot of the … Continue reading The Juice #2 – Panic! At the Coalmine

LFF 2020 – Absurdity and Affection in ‘Kajillionaire’

Although I had never seen any of Miranda July’s work prior to watching Kajillionaire, consider me hooked and eager to quench my thirst for her modes of storytelling. The deadpan humour, the imagery, the characters’ dynamic; it all really worked for me. Oozing pink bubbles, flight strangers and cunning plans made up the concoction for this piece and I was entertained throughout, to say the least.  … Continue reading LFF 2020 – Absurdity and Affection in ‘Kajillionaire’

‘Halloweentown’: A Celebration of Individuality and Community

There is no better holiday to celebrate individuality and community than Halloween, a holiday that has its roots in the festival of Samhain and All Saints Day. Historically seen as a time in which the boundaries between our world and the ‘Otherworld’ are weakened, Halloween is when communities would come together to give offerings to the spirits and remember or reconnect with the dead. Today, … Continue reading ‘Halloweentown’: A Celebration of Individuality and Community

TIFF 2020 – ‘Nomadland’ is a Delicate Masterpiece Questioning the American Dream

“I’m not homeless. I’m houseless. Not the same thing, right?” That’s a question permeating, unspoken and spoken multiple times throughout Fern’s (Frances McDormand) new life in Chloe Zhao’s sophomore feature Nomadland. What makes a home? What makes a house? What happens to those who live on the edges? Nomadland follows Fern, a rural Nevadan and recent widow who has fashioned her van (affectionately named “Vanguard”) … Continue reading TIFF 2020 – ‘Nomadland’ is a Delicate Masterpiece Questioning the American Dream

Redefining Rebellion: In Conversation with Kaleem Aftab

After 6 months of closure and online access to celebrated pieces, the BFI are back and open to the public with their ‘Redefining Rebellion’ season. This programme highlights the 25th anniversary and the 4K restoration of Mathieu Kassovitz’s La Haine, accompanied by other selected pieces that too explore these themes of conflict and justice. Amongst these are pieces such as Persepolis, Beau Travail, Taxi Driver, … Continue reading Redefining Rebellion: In Conversation with Kaleem Aftab

‘A Scanner Darkly’ Might Be the Trippy Sci-Fi Film You’re Looking For

What if I told you there was an upcoming science fiction film that stars Keanu Reeves, Robert Downey Jr., Winona Ryder, and Woody Harrelson? What if I told you that film was based on a story written by the same guy who gave us Blade Runner, Total Recall, and Minority Report? And imagine that film was directed by experimental director Richard Linklater. Would you be … Continue reading ‘A Scanner Darkly’ Might Be the Trippy Sci-Fi Film You’re Looking For

‘Fleabag’, Guilt, and Beautiful Grief

With the clatter of a donkey charging through a pit orchestra, Fleabag came crashing on our screens four years ago. In a show like this, jet black humour and sharp remarks concerning the very essence of womanhood (“Do I have a huge arsehole?”) run a mile a minute, so you’d think it would be easy to miss the deep moments. Where its star and creator, … Continue reading ‘Fleabag’, Guilt, and Beautiful Grief

Why We Need a Remake of ‘Fantasia’

The only Disney film that truly deserves this big-budget modernization is Fantasia. To be clear, I am not one of those people who’s upset that Disney is ruining its classic films by remaking them for today’s audiences. Movie blockbusters have been consumed by CGI for years, and it’s what most kids today recognize as film quality. Of course they’d rather see a 3D animated flying … Continue reading Why We Need a Remake of ‘Fantasia’

Back to the Future’s Pop Culture Impact, 35 Years On

On 3rd July 1985, Robert Zemeckis made cinematic and popular culture history with the release of science fiction epic, Back to the Future. It followed Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox), who finds himself travelling back in time from 1985 to 1955, where he comes across his future parents and becomes the romantic interest of his mother. The only way he could go back to 1985, … Continue reading Back to the Future’s Pop Culture Impact, 35 Years On

Remembering The Master: Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Fascinating Subversion of the Character Actor

Actors who believe their craft must be an intensely immersive process have always seemed compatible with a certain degree of self destruction. In 1989, Daniel Day Lewis famously quit the National Theatre’s production of Hamlet mid performance, collapsing backstage and never returning to the boards. He later described this as “A hard part to live with. It conjures up the demons in you.” The godfather … Continue reading Remembering The Master: Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Fascinating Subversion of the Character Actor

The Slice Recommends: Hidden Treasures of Animation

The Slice team have come together to explore their favourite, under-appreciated, animated classics. These are films which can really mean so much to us, with a pure personal messages, or even those that have fantastic humour and uplift us. Treasure Planet (2002) Treasure Planet is one of Disney’s most emotional features, but beyond that, it’s one of their most visually psychedelic and inventive ones too. … Continue reading The Slice Recommends: Hidden Treasures of Animation