LFF 2020 – ‘Rose: A Love Story’ Struggles to Tell a Story

The title of Rose: A Love Story wants you to know how subversive it’s being by really being “A Love Story” when it looks like a survivalist genre flick, featuring a deadly virus, post-apocalypse level isolation and moments of vampiric horror. Rose, unfortunately, fails to present any evidence of subversive or intelligent storytelling, and is dragged down by a flimsy script and tedious pacing. Married … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Rose: A Love Story’ Struggles to Tell a Story

LFF 2020 – ‘Possessor’ is a Tearing Bloody Horror with Some Lost Potentional

Brandon Cronenberg is definitely his father’s son. This is obvious from the beginning, with the ultra-gory psychologically induced scenes that continue to surprise and compel. His newest feature, Possessor, a horror fracturing dive into assassins who use brain implant technology to inhabit the bodies of others to terminate high profile targets. In terms of narrative and style, there is reason to say this is executed quite … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Possessor’ is a Tearing Bloody Horror with Some Lost Potentional

LFF 2020 – ‘One Man and His Shoes’ is an Engrossing Michael Jordon Marketing Documentary

For those happily basking in the feel-good glow of the Michael Jordan documentary series The Last Dance (2020), Yemi Bamiro’s dissection of the production history and cultural impact of Nike’s Air Jordan shoes shines a revealing light on the unsavoury corporate machinations of 1980s America, and how the ripples from this branding reverberate politically to this day. What starts out as a glossy, rapid-paced sports … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘One Man and His Shoes’ is an Engrossing Michael Jordon Marketing Documentary

LFF 2020 – ‘One Night in Miami’ is a Promising Debut from Regina King

Regina King makes her debut as a director in her based on a true story, One Night in Miami. It centres around Cassius Clay’s (Eli Goree) defeat of Sonny Liston (Aaron D. Alexander) in 1964. Clay when meets with Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir), Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.) and Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge), with an aim of changing the course of history in the segregated … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘One Night in Miami’ is a Promising Debut from Regina King

LFF 2020 – ‘Industry’ is Gripping Start to the Series

Investment bankers are not a profession with a good public image. Seen by many as responsible for the 2008 global financial crisis, it is easy to see why. So, this begs the question, what type of people would want to become investment bankers in today’s world? It is understandable that it’s a role that pays particularly well, but the dubious ethical nature of the work … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Industry’ is Gripping Start to the Series

Review – ‘Nocturne’: Sydney Sweeney’s Sinister Symphony

Welcome to the Blumhouse has produced their first quadtych of features for us to consume and enjoy this Halloween season, with an interesting mixture of stories and actors. Personally, I found Nocturne to be the most appealing and interesting of them all – seeing Sydney Sweeney venture into Horror ensured a curiosity, and the idea of sacrificial art always hints at a great avenue for … Continue reading Review – ‘Nocturne’: Sydney Sweeney’s Sinister Symphony

‘Creep 2’: The Struggle To Make ‘Good’ Art

A Recap There are three key take-aways from Creep (2014).  Josef has killed before.  Josef will kill again.  Josef is a filmmaker, albeit an incredibly unethical one.  Grave Encounters Where Creep is a slow descent into the unknown, Creep 2 (2017) is the process of unpacking what we’ve witnessed in the last installment. This ‘unpacking’ is done by our new protagonist, Sara (Desiree Akhavan) who … Continue reading ‘Creep 2’: The Struggle To Make ‘Good’ Art

LFF 2020 – ‘Days’ Emphasises on Small Significant Moments

Tsai Ming-liang returns from exile to bring to us his new film Days, a film that captures the beauty and sometimes heartache of those fleeting interactions you think about forever. Starring Tsai’s long-time collaborator Lee Kang-Sheng, the film follows two men as they slowly meet, and then part, their before and afters completely unknown to us.  Days is a film entirely about the moment. Despite a runtime … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Days’ Emphasises on Small Significant Moments

Review – ‘Dick Johnson is Dead’: the Power of Father and Daughter in the Face of Doom and Gloom

How do you document something that hasn’t happened yet? Most documentaries are about what happened right there – at that moment – in that space. Yet, how do you make a documentary about an event that will happen? How about someone’s death? With Dick Johnson is Dead, filmmaker Kirsten Johnson (Cameraperson) invites us into the life of her father, Richard “Dick” Johnson as he approaches the tipping point in his battle with … Continue reading Review – ‘Dick Johnson is Dead’: the Power of Father and Daughter in the Face of Doom and Gloom

Review – ‘Herself’ Showcases the Emotional Resilience of Motherhood

The beauty of film comes in its ability to translate the untranslatable – emotion can be such a fickle and loose thing, where we know exactly how we’re feeling but simply cannot find the words. There’s a raw power to emotion that can overwhelm us at the best of times, making it impossible to present what you’re feeling in a concise and clear way whilst … Continue reading Review – ‘Herself’ Showcases the Emotional Resilience of Motherhood

LFF 2020 – ‘Sound for the Future’ is a Unique Look into Post-Punk

What is post-punk? It is a classification given to bands from The Specials to Orange Juice, from The Fall to DEVO. At its base it is a slower, more reggae influenced punk, heavier on bass and less focused on the rejection of a faceless and apolitical “authority”. Heavy stuff. Very theoretical. There have been many books written on the post-punk era, Simon Reynolds’ Rip It Up … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Sound for the Future’ is a Unique Look into Post-Punk

Bold Patterns & Bright Prints: An ‘Emily in Paris’ Style Critique

Oh, Paris… the fashion capital of the world. From berets to plaid sets to an abundant amount of floral prints, it was easy to see what Netflix’s Emily in Paris was trying to pull off. However, the outdated pieces and vibrant prints have led to many commentaries and confusion from viewers worldwide.   The show stars Lily Collins as Emily, a young woman working in the marketing field with a focus on social media engagement. She starts off in … Continue reading Bold Patterns & Bright Prints: An ‘Emily in Paris’ Style Critique