LFF 2020 – ‘Wolfwalkers’ is Magical and Vital Animated Journey

Wolfwalkers is the newest animated feature by the Oscar-nominated animation studio, Cartoon Saloon, which is the creators of such mesmerizing films The Secret of Kells, and Song of the Sea. As the last installment of the “Irish folk trilogy”, Wolfwalkers is a magical tale of unlikely friendship between two girls in 17th-century Ireland. In a 17th century Irish village called Kilkenny, a young girl named … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Wolfwalkers’ is Magical and Vital Animated Journey

LFF 2020 – ‘Never Gonna Snow Again’ is Visually Pleasing Yet Repetitive

In a wealthy gated Polish estate, made up of rows and rows of newly built, spacious and identical houses, dissatisfaction settles over everything. Couples observe tense silences, commit affairs, and struggle to connect with their children. While all their homes look alike, they couldn’t be more separate from each other, and gossiping happens as soon as doors are closed. As they push further on into … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Never Gonna Snow Again’ is Visually Pleasing Yet Repetitive

Review – ‘Black Box’ is a Suspenseful Welcome to Blumhouse

The Blumhouse brand has quickly become synonymous with successful horror movies, so they’ve gone all out in packaging their latest four films under the banner of ‘Welcome to the Blumhouse’, each exclusively streaming on Amazon Prime Video. Each of these offers something unique, from spirits and psychos to science fiction — in the case of Emmanuel Osei-Kuffour Jr.’s Black Box. However, this film veers too … Continue reading Review – ‘Black Box’ is a Suspenseful Welcome to Blumhouse

LFF 2020 – Absurdity and Affection in ‘Kajillionaire’

Although I had never seen any of Miranda July’s work prior to watching Kajillionaire, consider me hooked and eager to quench my thirst for her modes of storytelling. The deadpan humour, the imagery, the characters’ dynamic; it all really worked for me. Oozing pink bubbles, flight strangers and cunning plans made up the concoction for this piece and I was entertained throughout, to say the least.  … Continue reading LFF 2020 – Absurdity and Affection in ‘Kajillionaire’

LFF 2020 – ‘Shirley’ is Ambitious but Lacked Thrills

Elisabeth Moss continues to expand her range as this cantankerous horror writer (based on Shirley Jackson). Her character is smart and verbally vicious, but also immensely troubled. When a young couple moves into their house, unusual things happen in several directions. This is primarily an exercise in putting complex characters in uncomfortable situations. As the relationships evolve, the drama abounds. Biopics about writers can be … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Shirley’ is Ambitious but Lacked Thrills

LFF 2020 – ‘Undine’ is Bold and Captiviating

Christian Petzold is a director renowned for his ability to bring historical narratives into our modern times with ease. His previous films, Barbara, Phoenix, and Transit have all grappled with German history while seamlessly drawing parallels with today. His latest film, Undine, is perhaps his most ambitious attempt to do this – based on the ancient myth of the same name.  Petzold’s take on the myth of the Undine is elusive at best, perhaps purposefully, … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Undine’ is Bold and Captiviating

LFF 2020 – ‘Mangrove’ is a Powerful Story About Racial Justice

Mangrove is part of the Small Axe anthology series, which comprises five original films by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Steve McQueen. It tells the true story of Frank Crichlow (Shaun Parkes), whose West Indian restaurant, Mangrove, a bustling community space in London’s Notting Hill attracted locals, activists, intellectuals and artists. In a reign of blatant racial discrimination, Crichlow finds himself and his drug-free business the target … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Mangrove’ is a Powerful Story About Racial Justice

Review – ‘Saint Maud’: Penance Has Never Been So Pleasing

Idolatry is a very dangerous thing – we see it constantly within the modern day, through influencer cult-like adoration, ‘stan accounts’ for celebrities; it has seeped into the DNA of entertainment. What becomes difficult when dissecting this modern-day idolatry is the intentions behind such reverence – why exactly do these people feel as though the individuals they look up to are worthy of such praise … Continue reading Review – ‘Saint Maud’: Penance Has Never Been So Pleasing

LFF 2020 – ‘Siberia’ is an Exploration into the Psychological Wilderness

Abel Ferrara’s latest film, Siberia, is a film better experienced without trying to interpret as it feels like a dreamlike odyssey. We follow Clint (Willem Dafoe), who has abandoned his former life as he now runs a bar in Siberia where he seems to be maybe the only English-speaker. He suffers from hallucinations as he embarks on a journey, led by his dog-sledge, to a cave where … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Siberia’ is an Exploration into the Psychological Wilderness

LFF 2020 – ‘Stray’ and the Significance of Dogs in a Community

2020 has been a good year for dogs. The UK population, confined during the strictest periods of lockdown to their homes – with the exception of trips to local parks for government-mandated exercise – have turned to canine friends new and old as both a source of affection and distraction. For pets who usually spend the nine to five staring wistfully out of the front … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Stray’ and the Significance of Dogs in a Community

LFF 2020 – ‘Mogul Mowgli’ is Riz Ahmed’s Most Personal Venture

Directed by Bassam Tariq, Mogul Mowgli follows a young rapper called Zed (Riz Ahmed) who is about to start a new tour. However, he finds himself strikes by a crippling illness which means he has to move back with his family. He is constantly trying to find himself between his music career and Pakistani family traditions. The film finds a lot of resonance in Zed’s experience … Continue reading LFF 2020 – ‘Mogul Mowgli’ is Riz Ahmed’s Most Personal Venture

Review – ‘Vampires vs. the Bronx’ is Lightweight Young Adult Fun

When you watch a film titled Vampires vs. The Bronx, you automatically associate with Attack the Block or Monster Squad. As you would expect, it’s a good time with the same magic from those other directors. It continues to possess the same charm as most horror comedies that have children leads. The first person who becomes aware of the vampires is Miguel (Jaden Michael) who … Continue reading Review – ‘Vampires vs. the Bronx’ is Lightweight Young Adult Fun